NIL has come to this: UGA cross country runner is modeling

Gambling company announces model deal as TSSAA approves NIL for high school students in Tennessee

ATHENS, Georgia (WDEF) – The move to pay school athletes has taken some twists on Thursday.

NIL has become a major player in college athletics.

It’s stands for Name, Image and Likeness.

Basically, the NCAA approved allowing athletes to cash in on themselves and remain amateurs.

That means getting paid for autographs, endorsements or appearing in commercials.

But now a new company is taking it further.

NIL Modeling Agency has signed their first college athlete.

She is University of Georgia cross country runner Victoria Schneider.

She will appear in glamor shots on the Gamble Sports Modeling website and social media, plus a national ad campaign.

The redshirt freshman has modeling experience with an agency and appearing in an Athens magazine.

She also runs her own online business, Victoria’s Bracelet Bar.

GSM CEO, Charles Gamble says “We are super excited to have a model of Victoria’s caliber to kick off our national marketing efforts.  She has confidence, experience, and the type of photo portfolio that GSM looks for in aspiring models.”

The announcement comes just as Tennessee officials approve NIL deals for high school athletes.

The TSSAA approved rule changes allowing young athletes to get paid for endorsement deals.

Students will be allowed to “receive payment for activities not related to performance provided that they are carried out in a manner that does not suggest or reasonably suggest the endorsement or sponsorship of the TSSAA school.”

he organization that oversees Tennessee high school sports cleared the way Thursday morning for young athletes to get paid for endorsement deals.
The Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association’s Legislative Council met in Murfreesboro to review various proposed bylaw changes.
Joining a growing trend across the country, it agreed to amend TSSAA bylaws regarding what compensation amateur high school athletes can receive.

Under the change approved Thursday, students will be able to “receive payment for activities not related to performance provided that they are carried out in a manner that does not suggest or reasonably suggest the endorsement or sponsorship of the TSSAA school.”

“The student’s activities for which they are compensated may not include an image or likeness of the student in a uniform, or other clothing or gear depicting the name or logo of the TSSAA member school the student is attending or has attended.”

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