Organization says Tennessee ranks #8 in US in hot car deaths

CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (WDEF) – A child recently died in a hot car in East Nashville.

Yesterday, a 1 year old died in a hot car in East Nashville after a father unknowingly left her in his truck.

Tennessee ranks number 8 in the nation in hot car deaths.

Police in Nashville say the child’s father dropped off his other child at daycare.

He apparently forgot about the girl and drove home, where she was left in a car seat.

The girl’s mother found her inside the truck Wednesday night.

The child was pronounced dead after she was taken to the hospital.

Police say the investigation is ongoing.

There have been 30 fatalities since 1990.

In the US, there have been a total of 7 child vehicular heatstroke deaths so far this year.

With 3 other pending autospies, the total could be 10.

Officials with Kids and Cars say this continues to happen because people believe it could happen to me.

The Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office launched the Look Before You Lock campaign began 3 years ago.

In 10 minutes, a car’s temperature can rise over 20 degrees. Even at an outside temperature of 60 degrees, the temperature inside your car can reach 110 degrees.

A child dies when his/her body temperature reaches 107 degrees.

They took the lead because their wasn’t a program like it in the county.

Statistically, child deaths due to vehicular heat stroke are at an all time low since 1998.

However, officials say “any death attributed to vehicular heat stroke is 100% preventable and completely unnecessary and unacceptable.”

The sheriff’s office says people often think that only “Bad Parents” leave their children unattended in hot cars, but they say truth is, it can happen to any parent due to a momentary lack of judgement or a moment of irresponsible, distracted behavior.

What are the signs of Heatstroke in Children?

Heatstroke can affect everyone in different ways, but knowing the basic warning signs can mean the difference between life and death. Commonly, heatstroke in children can include the following:

  • Red, hot, or moist dry skin
  • Signs of heat with no sweating
  • A strong rapid pulse or a slow weak pulse
  • Nausea, confusion, or acting strangely

How Temperatures Change in Cars

  • In 10 minutes, a car’s temperature can rise over 20 degrees.
  • Even at an outside temperature of 60 degrees, the temperature inside your car can reach 110 degrees.
  • A child dies when his/her body temperature reaches 107 degrees.

Always dial 911 immediately if you see an unattended child in a car. Law Enforcement and EMS professionals are trained to determine if a child is in trouble.

Officials say people should put a cell phone, PDA, purse, briefcase, gym bag or whatever is to be carried from the car, on the floor in front of a child in a backseat.

This triggers an adults memory to see children in the back seat when they open the rear door and reach for their belongings.

They say parents should also teach children not to play in any vehicle.

Motorists should also take precautions in the event of a break down on a highway, especially with children or elderly citizens in the vehicle. The HCSO suggests the following safety tips when traveling:

  • Contact 911 for assistance in emergencies
  • For highway emergencies occuring inside Tennessee, summon help immediately via cellular phone by dialing 911 or by dialing *THP (*847) to connect to the nearest THP District Headquarters
  • Have a basic first aid/survival kit, including at least two bottles of water per person in your vehicle.
  • If vehicle begins to overheat, turn off the air conditioner.
  • If a break down occurs, steer your vehicle as far away from the flow of traffic as possible.

Apps and Electronic Tools

There are also apps available for cell phones that help alert parents and caregivers they have left their child in a car. More information can be found by visiting:  https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.vb.kidsnkars

Some vehicle manufacturers are now making cars that flash messages on their inteior screens to alert drivers to check for children in the back seats.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.vb.kidsnkars

http://www.safercar.gov/parents/InandAroundtheCar/InandAroundtheCar.htm

 

 

Categories: Chattanooga, Featured, Hamilton County, Local News

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